Empowering Children Today

We work through partnerships with local communities and organizations. We provide at-risk children with caring homes, health care and education.

  • HOPE Children’s Recovery Centre in Ganta saves the life of young Solomon Sylvester.

     

    From 1990 to 1997, Liberia experienced one of the most tragic and catastrophic civil wars in Africa’s history. Over 300,000 people lost their lives. At that time, HOPE began working with war-affected children to help rebuild their lives and place them in foster homes. In 2003, the war broke out again. The aftermath left many children orphaned or abandoned with no place to go.

     

    HOPE Village was founded 1997 by HOPE partners Ken and Linda McAllister from Vancouver, BC. The village includes a farm, community, school (HOPE Academy), and the Children’s Recovery Centre. The goal was to create a self-sustainable community to benefit the children and families of a post-war Liberia. Solomon Sylvester is just one example of how such a community can change the lives of children at risk.

     

    Solomon was born to a teenage mother named Princess, and a 25 year old young man. Because Princess’ own mother detested Solomon’s father, the two women decided to kill baby Solomon rather than have a child from a man they despised. A police officer in the community caught Princess and her mother in the process of suffocating baby Solomon. The two women were arrested and baby Solomon was seized by the police. The officer documented the story and brought Solomon to HOPE for the Nations Children’s Recovery Centre.  

     

    When Solomon arrived he was frail, skinny, and severely undernourished as his mother had refused to breastfeed him in an earlier attempt to kill him.

     

    Thanks to the care and medical treatment at the Recovery Centre, Solomon is healthy and well and is going to live with his Father’s Mother.

     

    There is great opportunity in Ganta to change the lives of children whose world has been constantly changed and torn apart through war, tragedy, and poverty. HOPE Village continues to thrive and help the children of the area to give them hope and a future so they can reach their full potential and become our community of tomorrow.

     

    For more information or ways to get involved you can read more here.

     

     

  • With every story, whether it’s in a movie, a book, or real life, there needs to be an inciting incident that spurs our hero to change their life, to make a difference. This life-changing event is usually an inspiring turning point that alters the direction of the hero’s path forever.

     

    In this personal account from Executive Director for Hope for the Nations, Patrick Elaschuk, we meet one such hero. A hero named, Gary:

     

    It was a moment I’ll never forget. It was the beginning of a 3-day youth camp on the tropical garden Island of Samal in the Southern Philippines, and it got off to a ridiculous start. Nearly all the attendees of the camp would be considered children at risk; average age of 14 or 15, most were part of gangs and got their livelihood from the street, and some were carrying guns.

     

    Mango trees, nearby white sand, turquoise waters, a bunch of youth, and me. The camp started with a band playing church music and it didn’t seem like we would make it through the evening as the crowd mocked the music and made fun of the few people that were joining in.

     

    I had all but resolved to transition from the music into a full contact game of volleyball when something changed. Through sheer example, a teenager named Gary changed not only the destiny of the camp, but the destinies of many young people that night.

     

    To make a crazy story short, Gary, with more courage than many adults possess; just 14 years old and a gang member himself, changed the atmosphere of the whole camp from anarchy and disrespect, to a place where young people were on their knees crying out for the opportunity of a changed life.

     

    Many years later, even though he has witnessed the demise of dozens of his friends to unjust vigilantes and gangs, Gary is still going strong. Today, Gary is a role model to the slum community he grew up in as he finishes off his 4th year nursing degree at Davao Doctors College.

     

    When asked what was the catalyst that changed the direction of his life, Gary says it was the unconditional acceptance followed by the ongoing support of the HOPE team that empowered this former child at risk to become an agent of change!  

     

    Watch Gary’s Music Video Debut 

     

    Filmed in one of the communities where HOPE currently works. All actors are from the community, including Gary himself and Hope for the Nations founding board trustee Manolo. This video was produced for musician Andrew Judah.  Director SJ Finlay shot the film while on location in the Philippines.  The story portrays a real scenario for children at risk of finding their identities in gang culture.  For more videos by Reveal Creative, click HERE.

     

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    There are great stories of change happening right now in the Philippines through Hope for the Nations and the Philippines58 movement. More heroes like Gary are emerging to act as an example and make a difference in the lives of others. Thanks to support and resources provided by organizations like HOPE and through campaigns like Philippines58, we can help make those inciting incidents happen for children at risk all over the world.

     

    Filmed in one of the communities where HOPE currently works. All actors are from the community, including Gary himself and Hope for the Nations founding board trustee Manolo.

     

    Learn more about Philippines58

  • After working with children at risk in the region for over a decade, HOPE now turns its attention to helping aid relief efforts for West Africa’s growing Ebola crisis.

     

    "It is the world’s first Ebola epidemic, and it’s spiraling out of control. It’s bad now, and it’s going to get worse in the very near future. There is still a window of opportunity to tamp it down, but that window is closing. We really have to act now." - Dr. Tom Frieden, the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

     

    The Ebola crisis in West Africa is a very real threat, not just to Africa but, thanks to the ease with which the virus spreads, the entire world. The virus itself causes an acute illness which if left untreated is often fatal. Early supportive care includes rehydration and symptomatic treatments but at the moment there is no known cure and the virus currently carries a 50% fatality rate. This percentage is increased when the carrier already has a weak immune system which is why the virus has taken hold so quickly in areas like Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone. These areas lack infrastructural resources due to natural disaster and periods of conflict that have left many families and individuals without proper care, nutrition, and education.

     

    The latest stats from the World Health Organization are staggering:

    • 5,357 confirmed cases
    • 2,630 deaths
    • 45% of the cases happened in the last 4 weeks
    • Over 1000 new cases in the last 3 weeks
    • 318 Health-care Workers have contracted the virus
    • Number of beds available to treat an Ebola patient anywhere in Liberia: 0

     

    The statistics from this outbreak already exceed the totals from all previous Ebola outbreaks combined. The virus is spreading the quickest through Liberia thanks to an outbreak in the highly populated capital city of Monrovia.

     

    Hope for the Nations has worked in West Africa for the past decade and has brought about positive change to many families and children through a number of projects, programs, and facilities. In the wake of this crisis, many HOPE programs have had to temporarily close down for the safety of the staff, children, and families involved. Many HOPE resources are now being diverted to help aid the relief efforts in the affected areas. “So many are hungry,” says Karen Barkman, HOPE Director in Monrovia. “Food prices have skyrocketed and many are dying daily from Ebola. Every day Provision of Hope and Hope for the Nations are doing all we can to help in this crisis!”

     

    HOPE is currently asking for help from its partners and supporters to help aid the relief efforts and support the HOPE staff members who are operating on the frontlines. Money raised for relief efforts are going towards a number of things including:

     

    • Sanitizing stations with disinfectants and anti-bacterial soaps for many communities
    • Clean pure water for affected communities
    • Medical drugs for common diseases like malaria and typhoid that are currently unavailable due to clinics being closed
    • Food for the HOPE Children’s homes, and for quarantined areas where food is scarce or unavailable

      

    “We need more funding to help us care for our communities and our HOPE Families,” says Ken McAllister, HOPE Area Director for Liberia. “Most of these families will be losing their incomes which will make it impossible for them to pay for the increase in the cost of their family’s needs."

     

    We’re asking everyone to help during this global crisis in any way you can. There are a number of ways you can get involved and help aid the relief efforts in West Africa.

     

    On Sunday, September 28th, HOPE Director, Karen Barkman will be hosting a fundraising event in Kelowna, BC called ‘Walk a Mile in My Shoes’ at the Mission Creek Regional Park. You can find more information about that over at the Walk for Ebola website.

     

    HOPE is currently raising funds and have a project page setup where you can donate funds directly.

     

    If you’d like to learn more about HOPE’s relief efforts you can check out the recent news report by Global News.

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • In case you missed Global News earlier this week, HOPE was featured in a prominent story about relief efforts taking place in Liberia during the Ebola outbreak crisis. Country Director, Karen Barkman, and Executive Director, Patrick Elaschuk were both interviewed by Global News at the HOPE offices in Kelowna, BC regarding the relief efforts being made in Liberia.

    WATCH THE FULL STORY

    The Ebola outbreak has killed over 1500 people in West Africa and continues to spread. Many borders have been closed, food is becoming scarce, and daily life has been impacted to the point of civil unrest.

    HOPE has been working in West Africa for many years, aiding children and families at risk.

    We are thankful for our HOPE community that is rallying around this immediate need but there is more to be done. With the needs of the people in West Africa reaching an all time high, HOPE is seeking additional funding so they can continue their relief efforts, to provide food and health support to those affected by this terrible crisis. DONATE NOW!

     

     

     

  • President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf closed most of Liberia’s borders on Monday to try and halt the spread of the Ebola Virus.

    The countries affected are some of the poorest in the world and do not have the capacity or internal structures to deal with this outbreak. This is going viral and, if not contained, could infect many countries around the world.

    In order to attempt to protect the people, steps are being taken.

    “Preventive and testing centres will be established at the five entry points for all outgoing and incoming travellers,’’ the president announced.

    Johnson -Sirleaf also announced restrictions on public gatherings and requested hotels, restaurants, entertainment centres, and video clubs, to show educational Ebola prevention videos.

    “Communities seriously affected by the Ebola outbreak will be quarantined,’’ President Ellen stressed.

    One measure that HOPE is taking is to purchase 33 hand washing stations, one for each of our HOPE foster homes in the Ganta area.  Each one will have chloride so visitors coming and going can wash their hands which will help stop the spread of infection.

    Please donate here to help raise funds for this very important project.

     

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